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BestsellerE-book
Author Butterfield, Kevin, 1975- author.

Title The making of Tocqueville's America : law and association in the early United States / Kevin Butterfield.

Publication Info. Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, 2015.

Item Status

Description 1 online resource : illustrations
Series American beginnings, 1500-1900
American beginnings, 1500-1900.
Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents Introduction -- The concept of membership in America, 1783 -- 1815 -- Friendship, formalities, and membership in post-revolutionary America -- Politics, citizenship, and association -- A common law of membership -- Practices and limits, 1800 -- 1840 -- Everyday constitutionalism in a nation of joiners -- When shareholders were members: the business corporation as voluntary association -- Determining the rights of members -- Consequences: civil society in antebellum America -- Labor unions and an American law of membership -- Conclusion: the concept of membership in the age of reform.
Summary Alexis de Tocqueville was among the first to draw attention to Americans' propensity to form voluntary associations--and to join them with a fervor and frequency unmatched anywhere in the world. For nearly two centuries, we have sought to understand how and why early nineteenth-century Americans were, in Tocqueville's words, "forever forming associations." In The Making of Tocqueville's America, Kevin Butterfield argues that to understand this, we need to first ask: what did membership really mean to the growing number of affiliated Americans? Butterfield explains that the first generations of American citizens found in the concept of membership--in churches, fraternities, reform societies, labor unions, and private business corporations--a mechanism to balance the tension between collective action and personal autonomy, something they accomplished by emphasizing law and procedural fairness. As this post-Revolutionary procedural culture developed, so too did the legal substructure of American civil society. Tocqueville, then, was wrong to see associations as the training ground for democracy, where people learned to honor one another's voices and perspectives. Rather, they were the training ground for something no less valuable to the success of the American democratic experiment: increasingly formal and legalistic relations among people.
Local Note eBooks on EBSCOhost EBSCO eBook Subscription Academic Collection - North America
Subject Societies -- United States -- Membership -- History -- 18th century.
Societies -- United States -- Membership -- History -- 19th century.
Societies -- Membership -- Political aspects -- United States.
Voluntarism -- United States -- History -- 18th century.
Voluntarism -- United States -- History -- 19th century.
Social participation -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 18th century.
Social participation -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 19th century.
Associations, institutions, etc. -- Law and legislation -- United States -- History -- 18th century.
Associations, institutions, etc. -- Law and legislation -- United States -- History -- 19th century.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- General.
Associations, institutions, etc. -- Law and legislation.
Voluntarism.
United States.
Chronological Term 1700-1899
Genre/Form Electronic books.
History.
Other Form: Print version: Butterfield, Kevin, 1975- Making of Tocqueville's America 9780226297088 (DLC) 2015017046 (OCoLC)904413575
ISBN 9780226297118 (electronic bk.)
022629711X (electronic bk.)
9780226297088