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LEADER 00000cam a2200721Ki 4500 
001    ocn987911279 
003    OCoLC 
005    20180413100726.9 
006    m     o  d         
007    cr cnu---unuuu 
008    170524s2017    njua    ob    001 0 eng d 
020    9780813576886|q(electronic bk.) 
020    0813576881|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9780813576862 
020    |z0813576865 
020    |z9780813576855 
020    |z0813576857 
020    |z9780813576879|qelectronic book 
035    (OCoLC)987911279 
037    22573/ctt1q0fqrk|bJSTOR 
040    N$T|beng|erda|epn|cN$T|dYDX|dP@U|dIDEBK|dEBLCP|dJSTOR|dOTZ
       |dOCLCQ 
043    n-us--- 
049    RIDW 
050  4 GT2853.U5|bF565 2017eb 
072  7 TEC012000|2bisacsh 
072  7 HIS036060|2bisacsh 
072  7 SOC055000|2bisacsh 
072  7 SOC050000|2bisacsh 
072  7 CKB041000|2bisacsh 
072  7 TEC003090|2bisacsh 
082 04 394.1/20973|223 
090    GT2853.U5|bF565 2017eb 
100 1  Finn, S. Margot,|d1981-|eauthor. 
245 10 Discriminating taste :|bhow class anxiety created the 
       American food revolution /|cS. Margot Finn. 
264  1 New Brunswick, New Jersey :|bRutgers University Press,
       |c[2017] 
300    1 online resource (vii, 275 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
504    Includes bibliographical references and index. 
505 0  Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Introduction. 
       Discriminating Taste; 1. Incompatible Standards. The Four 
       Ideals of the Food Revolution; 2. Aspirational Eating. 
       Food and Status Anxiety in the Gilded Age and the 
       Progressive Era; 3. No Culinary Enlightenment. Why 
       Everything You Know about Food Is Wrong; 4. Anyone Can 
       Cook. Saying Yes to Meritocracy; 5. Just Mustard. 
       Negotiating with Food Snobbery; 6. Feeling Good about 
       Where You Shop. Sacrifice, Pleasure, and Virtue; 
       Conclusion. Confronting the Soft Bigotry of Taste; 
       Acknowledgments; Notes; Index; About the Author 
520    A provocative look at contemporary food culture, 
       Discriminating Taste critically examines cultural 
       touchstones from Ratatouille to The Biggest Loser, 
       identifying how ""good food"" is conflated with high 
       status. Drawing historical parallels with the Gilded Age, 
       Margot Finn argues that the rise of gourmet, ethnic, diet,
       and organic foods must be understood in tandem with the 
       ever-widening income inequality gap. 
588 0  Print version record. 
590    eBooks on EBSCOhost|bEBSCO eBook Subscription Academic 
       Collection - North America 
650  0 Food habits|zUnited States|xHistory. 
650  0 Food habits|xEconomic aspects|zUnited States. 
650  0 Food consumption|zUnited States|xHistory. 
650  0 Food consumption|xEconomic aspects|zUnited States. 
650  0 Food|xSocial aspects|zUnited States. 
650  0 Middle class|zUnited States|xSocial life and customs. 
655  4 Electronic books. 
655  7 History.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01411628 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aFinn, S. Margot, 1981-|tDiscriminating 
       taste.|dNew Brunswick, New Jersey : Rutgers University 
       Press, [2017]|z9780813576862|w(DLC)  2016025795
       |w(OCoLC)959034427 
856 40 |uhttps://rider.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://
       search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&
       db=nlebk&AN=1455671|zOnline eBook. Access restricted to 
       current Rider University students, faculty, and staff. 
856 42 |3Instructions for reading/downloading the EBSCO version 
       of this eBook|uhttp://guides.rider.edu/ebooks/ebsco 
948    |d20180419|cEBSCO|tEBSCOebooksacademic NEW 3-16to4-19 
       |lridw 
994    92|bRID